Very rarely is a substance so important – and prevalent – in the human body as is Co-enzyme Q10. As critical as it is, however, our body’s ability to make CoQ10 peaks at about age 21 and steadily declines as we age. By the time most of us are in our 80’s, our natural source of CoQ10 has declined by 60-65%. Stress, medical conditions and drug interactions, especially statin drugs, can contribute to its depletion. While foods such as beef, pork, chicken, organ meats and fatty fish are good sources of CoQ10, it’s nearly impossible for our diet alone to make up for loss from age-related or external factors.

Here’s why maintaining healthy levels of CoQ10 is important: it plays a role in fueling the energy production mechanism in every cell of our body and helps maintain optimal functioning of heart muscle and blood vessel walls. As a potent antioxidant, it protects the integrity of the cells, keeping oxidative stress at bay – essential for bolstering the cells against disease and the aging process. Research shows CoQ10 benefits people who are in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease. It also has been shown to improve the symptoms of congestive heart failure in some patients.

Signs of CoQ10 deficiency can vary tremendously from person to person and may include fatigue, muscle pains and/or spasms, joint pain, headache, frequent and long-lived illness and poor memory. There are tests available to check CoQ10 levels. If you’re deficient, consider taking a supplement. An interesting fact: because CoQ10 is present in just about all body tissue, the scientific name of this ubiquitous supplement is Ubiquinone.

There are two forms of CoQ10 supplements: Ubiquinone and Ubiquinol, both of which are generally recognized as safe for adults. Ubiquinone is the most studied form in all research prior to 2006. Ubiquinol was developed to offer the same benefits as its predecessor but with greater stability in capsule form – the preferred form used by most people. The ability to produce and absorb CoQ10 changes with age and health status. Talk with your holistic practitioner about the the amount and form best suited to your needs.

Resources

NCCIH.NIH.gov “Coenzyme Q10.” Accessed 22 Nov 2018: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/coq10
MayoClinic.com “Coenzyme Q10.” Accessed 22 Nov 2018: https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-coenzyme-q10/art-20362602
Hillinski, L. “Understanding the Two Forms of CoQ10.” Holistic Primary Care: News for Health and Healing. Posted 29 Aug 2017. Accessed 22 Nov 2018: https://www.holisticprimarycare.net/latest-articles/1902-understanding-the-two-forms-of-coq10.html
Fuke, C., Krikorian, S.A., Couris, R.R. Coenzyme Q10: a review of essential functions and clinical trials. US Pharmacist. 2000, 25(10), 28-41.
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